A sincere and professional service during your bereavement.

memorial service

The funeral is a ceremony of proven worth and value for those who grieve. It provides an opportunity for family and friends to express their love, respect, grief and appreciation for a life that has been lived. It permits facing openly and realistically the crisis death presents. Through the funeral we take that first step toward healing and adjustment to our loss.

memorial service

Providing excellent care when you and your family need it most.

The type of service conducted for the deceased is specified by the family. Our funeral directors are trained to assist families in creating personal, meaningful and unique services. The presence of friends at this time is an acknowledgement of friendship, love and support. It is helpful to friends and the community to have an obituary notice published announcing the death and type of service to be held. The type of service may be determined by somebody’s religious preference. Each religion has there own rites and traditions. There are also options for non-religious or humanist services.

memorial service

Frequently Asked Questions

Embalming is a service both to the deceased and to the living which is carried out by trained and qualified embalmers. Embalming allows the deceased to be presented with natural colouring and the absence of odour or other unpleasant changes which would otherwise follow soon after death.
Today, all of the Christian denominations, including the Catholic Church and the Church of Ireland allow Cremation.
As with burials, it is normal, but not obligatory to have the appropriate services celebrated in the local Church.
The coffin is then removed to the chapel in the Crematorium grounds where a short committal service, similar to that at the graveside in the case of burial may take place.
A Pre-Paid Funeral Plan allows any person the opportunity to plan in advance, and make financial provision for a funeral sometime in the future.
Pre-Paid Funeral Plans are often used to give assurance that the costs of a funeral will not be a source of difficulty, especially to relatives and friends.
They are sometimes used to order and thereby guarantee desired funeral arrangements.
This service is by invitation only and may be held at a place of worship, our funeral home or a family home. Usually, selected relatives and a few close friends attend the funeral service. Visiting hours are still an option. Typically, we discourage the idea of a “private service” because the people attending any funeral service care about and know your family. Having a “public service” does not mean that a bunch of strangers will attend.
A memorial service is a service without the deceased present and can vary in ceremony and procedures. Some families prefer public visitations followed by a private or graveside service with a memorial service later at the church or funeral home.
Friends and/or relatives may be asked to carry a loved one’s casket at the place of service. This is to be considered a great honour and should be undertaken with great respect. Because safety is a top priority, we recommend people with a strong back. If someone is unable to carry the casket, they may act as an honorary pallbearer. Some families may prefer to use our team of professional funeral bearers.
A eulogy or remembrance may be given by a member of the family or a close friend. The eulogy should offer praise and commendation and celebrate the life of the person who has lived. The family is responsible for making this decision.
Wearing colourful clothing is no longer inappropriate. Those attending a funeral should be dressed appropriately so as to show dignity and respect for the family and the occasion.
When the funeral ceremony and the burial are both held within the local area, friends and relatives may accompany the family to the cemetery. The procession is formed at the funeral home, church or place of service. The funeral director can advise you of the traffic regulations and procedures to follow while driving in a funeral procession. Always use caution while driving in a procession. Safety is always our primary concern.
Sending a card of sympathy, even if you are only an acquaintance, is an appreciated gesture. The card should be in good taste and in keeping with your relationship to the family of the deceased.
A personal note of sympathy is very meaningful. Express yourself openly and sincerely. An expression such as “I’m sorry to learn of your loss” is welcomed by the family and can be kept with other messages.
Speaking to a family member gives you an opportunity to offer your support and let them know you really care. If they wish to discuss their loss, don’t hesitate to talk with them about the deceased. Be a good listener!
Remember that grief doesn’t go away in a few short weeks. Adjusting and healing after a loss can be a lifelong process. Special days like birthdays or holidays may be the perfect time to pick up the phone and say, “I was thinking of you today.”